Start your Los Angeles area historic theatre explorations by heading to one of these major sections: Downtown | North of Downtown + East L.A. | San Fernando Valley | Glendale | Pasadena | San Gabriel Valley, Pomona and Whittier | South, South Central and Southeast | Hollywood | Westside | Westwood and Brentwood | Along the Coast | Long Beach | [more] L.A. Movie Palaces |
To see what's recently been added to the mix visit the Theatres in Movies site and the Los Angeles Theatres Facebook page.

Roxie Theatre: interior views

518 S. Broadway Los Angeles, CA 90013 | map |

The Roxie Theatre pages: history + vintage exterior views | recent exterior views | interior views |  

Lobby areas:


A peek in from Broadway to the Roxie lobby in 1943. In the display cases: "The Mysterious Doctor" and "Heaven Can Wait." The Roxie, opening in November 1931, was the last of the theatres to open on Broadway and the only one in an art deco style. Thanks to Bill Housos for the photo from his collection. It's one he purchased decades ago from the Theatre Historical Society.



Looking toward the Roxie lobby in 2014. The north side of the lobby, at left, was just renovated at the time of the photo and was awaiting a new tenant. Thanks to Hunter Kerhart for his photo. Keep up with his latest explorations: on Facebook | HunterKerhart.com | on Flickr



Looking in toward the south side of the lobby. Photo: Bill Counter - August 2014



A shot by Marty Culbert looking into the north side of the lobby during the 2014 renovation of that retail space. The photo originally appeared appeared on the LAHTF Facebook page as a post by Hillsman Wright.



The north side of the lobby. We have a wall, at right, dividing the lobby into two retail spaces. A look at the top of the photo will reveal that the lobby ceiling is gone -- we're looking up at the underside of the concrete slab.

Look at the floor for a glimpse of the terrazzo -- the front of this space was once the open entrance area around the boxoffice. The door at the rear will get you onto the stairs up to the house left side of the balcony lobby.  Photo: Bill Counter - August 2014



Looking up the north (house left) stairs toward the balcony lobby. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



The balcony lobby looking toward the stage. Note the steps of the upper balcony seating risers above us. The stairs at the center of the photo go up to the house left vomitory into the balcony. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



The balcony lobby looking toward Broadway. We're in the house left side of the balcony lobby. The room with the yellow sign above it is the men's room, facing out over Broadway. The lit doorway to its left was evidently either an office or storage. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014

The retailers in the two retail spaces the theatre lobby has been divided into each have use of half of the balcony lobby for a restroom and storage. The wall at the left separates off the house right (south) area. The main floor lobby is currently occupied as retail with no decorative features visible.



A balcony lobby west wall detail. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014


Vintage auditorium views: 


A main floor view c.1945. The photo is from the AMPAS B'hend and Kaufmann Collection and came from Tony Heinsbergen. It once was included in a Broadway photo album on the L.A. Conservancy website but vanished after a site makeover. 


 
A rare vintage view of the proscenium of the Roxie as viewed from the balcony. It's a c.1945 photo from the B'hend and Kaufmann Collection / Tony Heinsbergen via the L.A. Conservancy. 



The rear of the auditorium in 1943. Thanks to Bill Housos for the photo from his collection.


Recent views on the main floor:


A c.2008 main floor look at the stage when the auditorium was being used for storage. Thanks to the Roxie's owners, Downtown Management, for this photo and others that appear here that were once on their site DowntownFilming.com. The firm also owns the Arcade and Cameo Theatres as well as the nearby Chester Williams and Arcade Buildings.



A 2009 look at the boxoffice in an interesting location: the middle of the main floor. Thanks to Emily Yoshida for her photo on Flickr.



The house left wall as seen from the main floor. Photo: Emily Yoshida - Flickr - 2009



Admiring the deco interior. Photo: Emily Yoshida - Flickr - 2009



A boxoffice detail.  Photo: Emily Yoshida - Flickr - 2009  



Thanks to Elizabeth Brennan for this look toward the stage in 2014 during the filming of "Foxcatcher." It was once posted on Twitter. 



A main floor view during the 2014 "Foxcatcher" shoot. Again thanks to Elizabeth Brennan for the photo on Twitter -- and also to Hunter Kerhart for spotting these two views.  
 
 
 
A look in from house right with the main floor cleared. Thanks to Cap Equity Locations for the c.2019 photo. They're a firm that negotiates location use for feature films, TV shows and special events. See their Roxie Theatre page for 31 photos of the building. 
 


Thanks to Matt Lambros for this 2017 shot. See his fine After the Final Curtain post about the Roxie for more photos as well as a lively history of the building. See what Matt has been investigating lately on the After the Final Curtain Facebook page.  
 
 

 The rear of the auditorium. Photo: Cap Equity Locations - c.2019
 


A closer look to the rear. Photo: Matt Lambros - 2017
 
 
 
Across to house left. Photo: Cap Equity Locations - c.2019


Recent views from up in the balcony:


A look down when the building was being used as storage. Photo: Downtown Filming - c.2008 



Another shot from farther up the balcony. Photo: Downtown Filming - c.2008



A view across to house left. Photo: Downtown Filming - c.2008



A look back at the booth. Photo: Downtown Filming - c.2008



A balcony view of the proscenium. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



A detail of some of the proscenium plasterwork from Hunter's photo.



The auditorium from in front of the booth. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



A wider view from the top of the balcony. Photo: Matt Lambros - 2017



The empty stage from house left. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



Looking across from the front of the balcony house right. Best remaining seats: row two, party of four only. Note the interesting layout of the thrust stage that was added for some filming. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



The house left wall. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



The front of the colorful booth. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



A closer look at the deco pattern on one of the ceiling beams. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014. Thanks for all the photos, Hunter!



The vista from the top of the balcony house right. Photo: Matt Lambros - 2017. This one made an appearance on the After the Final Curtain Facebook page


Up in the booth: 


Thanks to Matt Lambros for this great 2017 shot. See his fine After the Final Curtain post about the Roxie for more photos as well as a lively history of the building.



A view down from the booth. It's a 2015 Trevor Hammonds photo appearing as a post for the SoCal Historic Architecture private Facebook group.


Backstage:
 

A look to the back wall with a peek off right. Photo: Cap Equity Locations - c.2019
 


The stage right wall. Photo: Mike Hume - 2019
 
 

A view to stage left c.2019. Thanks to Cap Equity Locations for the use of their photos. See their Roxie Theatre page for 31 photos of the building.  



A look into the house. Mike Hume - 2019. Thanks to Mike for his photos. Check up on his theatre explorations in Los Angeles and elsewhere on his terrific Historic Theatre Photography site.

The Roxie Theatre pages: history + vintage exterior views | recent exterior views | back to top - interior views |

| Downtown: theatre district overview | Hill St. and farther west | Broadway theatres | Spring St. theatres | Main St. and farther east | downtown theatres by address | downtown theatres alphabetical list

| Westside | Hollywood | Westwood and Brentwood | Along the Coast | [more] Los Angeles movie palaces | the main alphabetical list | theatre history resources | film and theatre tech resources | theatres in movies | LA Theatres on facebook | contact info | welcome and site navigation guide |

2 comments:

  1. I wish people would have had the good sense to photograph the theaters in the glorious heyday. . . I had the good fortune of being able to see movies in these old glamorous theaters before they were closed off to the public. You could still see the glamour of old Hollywood underneath the dirt and grime from years of not taking care of the theaters. . .

    ReplyDelete
  2. 0 cuidado ,a quien se le ocurrió abrir esa tienda justo Ai 🤦🏿‍♂️

    ReplyDelete