Start your Los Angeles area historic theatre explorations by heading to one of these major sections: Downtown | North of Downtown + East L.A. | San Fernando Valley | Glendale | Pasadena | San Gabriel Valley, Pomona and Whittier | South, South Central and Southeast | Hollywood | Westside | Westwood and Brentwood | Along the Coast | Long Beach | [more] L.A. Movie Palaces |
To see what's recently been added to the mix visit the Theatres in Movies site and the Los Angeles Theatres Facebook page.

Navigating Your Tour of Historic Los Angeles Theatres

On a Mobile Device: If you're missing the right column navigation bar or links at the top you can go to the bottom of any page and click on "View Web Version." Still can't find what you're looking for? Send me an email at counterb@gmail.com. See you at the movies! -- Bill Counter

Downtown L.A. Historic Theatres

The survey page gives a rundown on the 20 major surviving theatre buildings in the Downtown Theatre District. There are links to pages about each of them for more detail. You might also want to consult alphabetical rundowns on pages for Hill St. and farther west, the Broadway Theatres, Spring St. Theatres and Main St. and farther east. Those pages give you more detail, including discussions about all the theatres that have vanished. In addition, there's a downtown alphabetical theatre list with alternate names and a theatre list by address.

Historic Hollywood Theatres

Hollywood wasn't just about the movies. Starting in the mid 20s it was also a center for legitimate theatre and musical revues at four newly built playhouses. You'll find an alphabetical list of the theatres in the district on the Hollywood Theatres overview page that includes a bit of data on each and links to pages for more details. Down below this list there's also an alternate name directory. Also of possible interest is a separate page with a list of theatres by street address.

 Westside Theatres

The Westside started booming with retail and housing in the mid 20s and the theatres followed. Many theatres along Wilshire Blvd., in Beverly Hills, and in other neighborhoods became prime venues for everything from small foreign films to major roadshows. It's a huge territory. The Westside Theatres overview page gives you both a list by neighborhood as well as a survey arranged alphabetically. Also see the list of Westside Theatres: by street address and the Westside Theatres: alphabetical list page which includes alternate names.

Westwood and Brentwood

Westwood Village was the third significant theatre district to evolve in Los Angeles, after Downtown and Hollywood. With the construction of the UCLA campus beginning in the late 20s there was a chance to develop a unique shopping and entertainment district for faculty and students. By the 1970's the area had evolved so that Westwood had the largest concentration of first run screens of any neighborhood in Los Angeles. The Westwood and Brentwood Theatres overview page will give you a tour of the area.

Theatres Along the Coast

Santa Monica had a vibrant theatrical life even in the days when it was a small town isolated from the rest of Los Angeles. And that's just the beginning. The Along the Coast section will give you links to discussion of theatres in Ocean Park, Venice, Hermosa Beach, San Pedro, Long Beach and other communities.

[more] L.A. Movie Palaces

This section fills in all the other areas of Los Angeles County. Hundreds of terrific theatres were being built by the studios and independents all over the L.A. area in the 20s and into the 30s.  You'll find coverage of theatres north and east of Downtown as well as in Glendale, Burbank, Pasadena, the San Gabriel Valley, Pomona, Whittier, Long Beach and many other far flung locations.   Some of those listings have been upgraded and appear on this site, many other links will take you to pages on an older site hosted on Google. The index page has links to all these theatres organized by area.

Searching by theatre name

If you don't find it in the right hand column, head for the Main Alphabetical List, which also includes the various alternate names each venue has used. This list includes those pages recently updated for this site (in bold face) as well as the write ups on an older website. For a narrower focus you'll also find separate lists for Westside and Downtown. As well, there are lists by name on the 10 survey pages for more limited areas like Pasadena, North of Downtown, Long Beach, etc. that are listed on the [more] Los Angeles Movie Palaces page.

Searching by address

If you know an address or street head to either the Main Theatre List by Address, the San Fernando Valley List by Address, the San Gabriel Valley, Pomona and Whittier List by Address or the Long Beach List. If what you're looking for isn't there, you should find a link to take you to a more localized list by address for Downtown, WestsideHollywood, etc. Also see the survey pages for more limited areas that are listed on the [more] Los Angeles Movie Palaces page.

Happy touring! Please contact me if you spot errors, links that don't work, etc.  

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Bentley Theatre

319 on the Pike Long Beach, CA 90802  | map 

Opened: 1908. It was on the north side of The Pike in the middle of the block between Cedar Walk and Chestnut Pl. That's the tapered top of the theatre's stagehouse in the center of this detail from a c.1908 postcard. On the left is the Virginia Hotel, begun in 1906 and opened in 1908. Just to the right of the Bentley, behind that yellowish bandstand on the beach, can be seen the spires of the entrance to the Tarrytown Theatre. On the right is the curved roof and Mission-style facade of the Majestic Rink, with its "dancing" sign on the roof. 

The Bentley building's address slopped around a bit, both when it was a theatre and later when it was repurposed as retail spaces: 315-317-319. At one time or another there were eight theatres on the 300 block. The Bentley's nearest theatre neighbors on the north side were the Tarrytown / Palace of Pictures / Pastime at 311-313 on the east and the Bijou Theatre, on the west at 333.

Construction of the new Bentley, along with other theatre action, had been noted in a March 5, 1908 L.A. Times that was located by Ken McIntyre:

"SURFEIT OF THEATERS The city, after a famine, is to have a surfeit of playhouses. A deal for a third theater was closed today between the Seaside Water Company and the E.C. Edmundson and R.C. McDonald, former manager of the Long Beach Theater. The site leased is a 58 x 200 foot lot between the bath-house and the Majestic Rink, and heretofore has been used as a children's playground. Mr. McDonald has the plans and capital for a modern theater which will be erected at once and will cost $40,000. Meanwhile, the new Tarrytown, a block west, is being built, and the Naples Construction Company today signed contracts to begin work on the Bentley Theater, west of the Majestic Rink."

Evidently the "third theater" noted in the article to be "erected at once" by McDonald didn't happen. The site between the bathhouse and the rink got a theatre on it in 1910, the Columbia, at 235 The Pike. Later on the site was Hoyt's, a house that ended up as the Strand Theatre.
 
Seating: 1,500  

Architect: Unknown
 
 
 
Thre Bentley appears on the north side of The Pike (aka the "Walk of a Thousand Lights") in this detail from a 1908 Sanborn Map appearing courtesy of Ronald W. Mahan. The Byde-A-Wyle is shown in blue over on the lower left at 336 and the Art is across from the Bentley at 314. 

In the 1908 Thurston city directory the Bentley Theatre is listed as 317 "On The Pike." It's listed as the Bentley Grand, 317 "On The Pike," in the 1909-1910 Thurston directory with Perry Girton as manager. In the 1911 through 1916 city directories of several different publishers it continued to be listed as the Bentley Grand at 317.   

The theatre suffered some damage in a 1913 earthquake. This item appeared in the July 19, 1913 issue of Southwest Builder and Contractor: 

"Long Beach -- plans are being prepared for the reconstruction of the Bentley-Grand Theater on The Pike, east of Chestnut Place, owned by Eastern capitalists, at the head of which is I. H. Bentley of Minneapolis. The building will be brick and will have a seating capacity of 1,200..."

In the 1916-17 Long Beach directory published by Los Angeles Directory Co. it's called the Empress Bentley at 317 The Pike. E. E. Gagnon was the manager at the time. In 1917's directory by Seaside Printing Co. we get a listing under theatres for "Hart Bros." at 319 The Pike. In Seaside's 1918 directory it's the Hart Theatre. The Hart guys also had a Hart Theatre running out on Anaheim St. in 1923 - 24.
 
In the 1919 directory it's called the Hip, again at 319. An item in the May 7, 1919 issue of the Long Beach Press was headed "Real vaudeville to open tonight at Hip Theatre." The July 21, 1919 issue of the Long Beach Telegram noted "Big audience thinks at Hip Theater," whatever that meant. 
 
In the 1920 city directory issued by Western Directory Co. it's called the Strand Theatre at 319 and under the management of Beier & Freshwater.  
 
 
 

A December 21, 1920 Daily Telegram ad for the theatre as the Strand. Thanks to the Ronald W. Mahan Collection for sharing it. See the page about the other Strand Theatre, the former Hoyt's in the 200 block, that stayed with the name substantially longer.

Closing: 1921 was it for the Bentley. The Los Angeles Public Library's California Index summarized an item that had appeared in the January 21, 1921 issue of Southwest Builder and Contractor: 

"The former Bentley Theater, Long Beach, will be remodeled into a dance hall; address given as 319 The Pike; estimated cost $25,000." 

The theatre is not listed in the 1921 or later directories.

Status: The building was repurposed. In later years it saw use as a billiard hall, restaurant and Oriental art store called Wing's. At some point the stagehouse was removed. Demolition was sometime in the 1970s.
 

c.1907 - An early Pike postcard with not much development yet on the west end. The Virginia Hotel is under construction. This side of it there's no sign of the Bentley yet. The card was on eBay where Deleah2 got $12.50 for it. The building with the classical columns is the Bathhouse, dating from 1902. Beyond is the arched roof of the Majestic Rink, first used for roller skating, later for dancing.
 
 
 
c.1908 - This is the postcard view of the west end of The Pike that the detail at the top of the page was taken from. From the left, the major buildings are the Virginia Hotel, the Bentley Theatre, the Majestic Rink with its arched roof, and the Bathhouse. The Tarrytown Theatre at 313 was to the right of the Bentley. Thanks to Michelle Gerdes for spotting the card on eBay.

The rear of the card says: "VIEW OF STRAND, LONG BEACH, CAL., Seen on Tilton's 100-Mile Trolley Trip. Here is what it would cost you to visit the points seen on Tilton's Trip: Pasadena and Ostrich Farm..... $.50    San Gabriel Mission and Orange Groves..... .55    Long Beach.... .50    Alamitos Bay and Naples.... .20    Total individual cost.... $1.75. But all for $1.00 on Tilton's Cars, with a reserved Chair Free and a Competent Guide. Cars leave daily, 9 and 9:30 A.M., Pac. Elec. Depot, Cor. 6th & Main Sts., Los Angeles. Phones, Main 8980 or F2444."

 
 
1910 - We're looking west with the Virginia Hotel in the distance. This side of it the Bentley Theatre with its stagehouse is visible. In front of the Bentley we get a unique view of the curvy facade of the Majestic Rink, here appearing very white. The Theatorium, on Board Walk, here colored brick red, is on the far right. Thanks to Michelle Gerdes for locating this in the collection of Loyola Marymount University.  
 
Card Cow has several versions: #103537 | #238226 | #106352 - postmarked 1913. A version of the card is in the Long Beach Public Library collection. The Library also has the black and white photo used to create the card. On the image the photographer, "J.A.," has dated it 1910.
 

 
1910 - A detail from the card in the LMU collection giving us an oblique view of the Bentley's facade.  The theatre has signage on its side wall saying "Bentley." It's unclear what "10 years the standard" on the side of the stagehouse is supposed to be advertising. Note the pylons of the Tarrytown facade in the center of the image and the "Dancing" sign atop the arched roof of the Majestic Rink.
 
 
 
c.1913 - Just beyond the Majestic Rink that's the Bentley's stagehouse with the ad for Owl cigars on the side. This photo taken from the pier is in the Long Beach Public Library collection. 
 
 
 
c.1915 - A photo of the Bentley stagehouse advertising El Belmont cigars. That's the Virginia Hotel over on the right. It's a photo from the Historical Society of Long Beach that appears on the Cal State Long Beach page on the Bentley. 
 
 
 
c.1918 - A fine shot of the back of the theatre sent off to friends or relatives by someone performing there. Thanks to Michelle Gerdes for spotting this on eBay. In the margin it was written: "The back of our theater and the place where the rest live." 
 

 
c.1918 - A lovely postcard view looking west on The Pike. That Hart Theatre sign on the right is the name the Bentley was going under at the time. On the far right note the lit pylons of the Tarrytown/Pastime Theatre. The nicely lit clamshell entrance on the left is the Art Theatre at 314. The card is from the Ronald W. Mahan Collection and appears on the Cal State Long Beach page about the Art Theatre. 
 

 
c.1920 - An image from the Ronald W. Mahan collection where Ron has outlined the Bentley. At the time of the photo it had been renamed the Strand, as seen on the theatre's side wall. Just this side of the Strand sign note the pylons of the Tarrytown facade, here seen as one very dark, one brighter. At this time, if it were even still in business as a theatre, it would have been called the Pastime. 
 
The theatre this side of the Rink, on the site of the earlier Columbia Theatre, is Hoyt's at 235. It would later become the Strand Theatre. The photo appears on the Cal State Long Beach page about the Bentley. 

 
 
c.1925 - On the bottom at the center it's a look down onto part of what had been the Bentley. Here we see the brown side of the building with several windows in it. To the left of the former theatre are three of the four buildings (one's obscured from this angle) to the east on the Tarrytown site. Then on the other side of Cedar, it's the Majestic Rink. In the distance on the left note the State Theatre and the Municipal Auditorium
 
The building across The Pike with the circular red roof housed the Looff carousel. The second building to the right of the Looff building, the short one, had been the Art Theatre at 314. The building with the curvy Mission-style facade right above the "C" in Card Cow was once the home of the Gaiety Theatre at 330 on the Pike. This copy of the card from the Card Cow collection had a 1930 postmark. 
 
 
 
1933 - A view east with  part of the building that had once been the Bentley on the far left. The storefront we see was Wing's Oriental art store at 315. The location of that next group of four single-story buildings had decades earlier been the site of the Tarrytown and Pastime Theatres at 311-313. The arched roof of the Majestic Rink can be seen just to the left of the arm of the streetlight. The roof sign of the Strand Theatre is beyond, against the tower of the Ocean Center building. It's a photo in the Long Beach Public Library collection.  


 
1933 - A post-quake view looking west along the 300 block toward Chestnut Pl. The building with the signage for "Wing's" and the hand identifying it as 315 The Pike, is the repurposed Bentley Theatre building, 315-317-319. Thanks to Ken McIntyre for locating the photo.
 
The large building in the center of the image with the peaked roofline is on the site of the Joyland Theatre at 335. Just this side of it with the curved parapet is the former Bijou Theatre location at 333. It's unknown if the building we see here housed the theatre in the 1910s or if this was a later replacement. The Pastime Theatre had once been on the right at 311, perhaps where that second building is, behind the scale.
 

 
1933 - A view in a bit closer to the former Bentley. Note those interesting "lanterns" on either end of the facade. This Austin Studio view is in the California State Library collection, their item #01391404. 
 
 
 
1940 - A look at the territory from above. The Rink is in the upper center. The four buildings on the Tarrytown site are to the left of the Rink and then there's the larger rebuilt Bentley Theatre building. To the right of the rink is the Strand Theatre. It's a photo in the Los Angeles Public Library collection. 
 
 
 
1940 - A detail from the Library's photo indicating the rebuilt Bentley building. 
 
 
 
1959 - A terrific view of the Pike with the Strand two thirds of the way up on the right edge of the image. To the left of the Strand is the big arched roof of the Majestic Rink/Lido. Keep looking left across Cedar Walk and note the four long skinny buildings, a site once for the Tarrytown / Pastime theatres. The larger building to the left of those four is the building that was formerly the Bentley. It's right behind the steeple of the circular Looff's carousel building. Thanks to Augie Castagnola for locating the photo for a post on Facebook. He notes that over on the left, up on Ocean Blvd., the Long Beach Superior Courthouse is under construction.
 
 
 
c.1965 - Wing's at 315 in the rebuilt Bentley building is seen in this view west. Beyond, it's the building with the curvy parapet at the Bijou location and larger, two-story building on the Joyland site. On the left note the "Looff's Amusements" sign on their old carousel building. Thanks to Sarah in Vegas for sharing her photo.
 

 
2018 - Recognize the neighborhood? Straight ahead we're looking west on The Pike, now dubbed "The Walk of a Thousand Lights." The Bentley was once down there about a hundred feet on the right, with the Tarrytown / Palace of Pictures / Pastime this side of it at various times. On the right in the foreground it's Cedar Walk, heading up toward Ocean Blvd. Photo: Google Maps

More information: There isn't any more about the Bentley.

The pages about the Gaiety, Tarrytown and the Joyland have additional views of the 300 block between Cedar Walk and Chestnut Pl. 

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Bijou Theatre

333 on the Pike Long Beach, CA 90802 | map |

Opening: The Bijou probably opened in 1910. The location was on the north side of The Pike toward the west end of the block between Cedar Walk and Chestnut Pl. The block had eight different theatres on it at one time or another. The Bijou's nearest theatre neighbors on that side were the Joyland to the west at 335 and and the Bentley at 319 to the east.

It's not in the 1909-1910 directory but is listed consistently in the 1911 through 1918 city directories, always with the 333 address.

Seating: Unknown. 

Closing: 1918 might have been it. It's not in the 1919 city directory. 

Status: It's been demolished, like everything else on The Pike. The area has been invaded by multiple condo buildings. 
 
 
 
1910 - The Bijou's building appears in this detail from a postcard Michelle Gerdes located in the collection of Loyola Marymount University. The vacant lot to the left would soon be the site of the Arrowhead / Joyland Theatre. To the right of the Bijou are are the Bentley Theatre at 319, the spires of the Tarrytown / Palace of Pictures at 313, the very white facade of the Majestic Rink, and the Columbia Theatre at 237, just before the striped awnings. It was later the site of the Hoyt's / Strand.


 
1910 - The card the detail was taken from. We're looking west with the Virginia Hotel in the distance. The Theatorium, on Board Walk, here colored brick red, is on the far right. Card Cow has several versions of this: #103537 | #238226 | #106352 - postmarked 1913. A version of the card is in the Long Beach Public Library collection. The Library also has the black and white photo used to create the card. On the image the photographer, "J.A.," has dated it 1910. 
 
 
 
1933 - A post-quake view looking west along the 300 block toward Chestnut Pl. The large building with the peaked roof a bit left of center (335-337-339) is the one that was built on the site of the Joyland. Just this side of it with the curved Mission-style facade is the former Bijou location at 333. The 1932 city directory listed a billiard hall for the 333 address. 
 
The building with the signage for "Wing's" and the hand identifying it as 315 The Pike, is the repurposed Bentley Theatre building, 315-317-319. The Pastime Theatre at 311 had once been on the right, perhaps was where that second building is, behind the scale. Before the Pastime came along several of those lots were the location of the Tarrytown and Palace of Pictures. Thanks to Ken McIntyre for locating the photo. 
 
 
 
c.1965 - We're looking west again toward the building with the curvy parapet at the Bijou location. It's just this side of the larger, two-story building. On the left note the "Looff's Amusements" sign on their old carousel building. Thanks to Sarah in Vegas for sharing her photo.
 

 
2018 - Here's the rebuilt neighborhood. We're looking west on The Pike, now dubbed "The Walk of a Thousand Lights." The Bijou would have been down there half a block on the right. The cross street in the foreground is Cedar Walk with Ocean Blvd. up the hill to the right. Photo: Google Maps.

More information: This is all there is on the Bijou. 

The pages about the Gaiety, Tarrytown and the Joyland have additional views of the 300 block between Cedar Walk and Chestnut Pl. 

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Brayton Theatre

2157 Atlantic Ave. Long Beach, CA 90806 | map

Opened: July 30, 1925. It was on the west side of the street between E. 21st St. and E. Hill St. Thanks to the Ronald W. Mahan Collection for the c.1925 photo. It can be seen on the Cal State Long Beach page on the Brayton Theatre.

They had intended to open earlier. The May 17 issue of the Long Beach Press Telegram advised "New theater opening set for June 15th."

Architects: Schilling & Schilling designed the theatre for owner George F. Brayton. The February 6, 1925 issue of Southwest Builder and Contractor reported:

"Brick theater -- Schilling and Schilling, 313 Marine Bank Building, Long Beach, are preparing plans for 2-story theater with stores and offices, for William H. Brayton, on Atlantic Ave. near Hill St., Long Beach. 4-stores, 4 offices, 80 x 150 feet, brick walls...$100,000."

The February 20 issue reported that Charles H. Bigelow got a $35,000 contract to put the building up. The same architects also designed the rebuild following the 1933 earthquake damage. The April 28, 1933 issue of Southwest Builder and Contractor had the news: 

"Theater repairs -- Architect and Engineer Schilling & Schilling...have completed plans for repairing theater building at 2157 Atlantic Ave. for George F. Brayton...New reinforced concrete and brick front wall, stucco exterior, new composition roofing, roof trusses, concrete lintels, side walls of brick, steel sash, neon lights...metal marquise...balcony seats...painting and decorating...The estimated cost is $8000."

Seating: 956 is the number from the Film Daily Yearbooks of 1950 and 1952, according to research by Ken Roe. 
 

A 1927 flyer from the collection of the Historical Society of Long Beach. It appears on the Cal State Long Beach page on the Brayton Theatre.
 
 

An October 1933 program Matt Spero found while exploring the ruins during the theatre's demolition.
 
 
 
The reverse side of the October 1933 program. Thanks, Matt!

The house had a closing in the early 50s. Later it reopened as a venue running weekend matinees for kids. In 1966 and 1967 it was a War on Poverty teen center with performances by a teen theatre troupe. 

William Miller notes he found ads in the summer of 1969 for the "newly opened" theatre charging adults 99 cents and kids 49 cents. The summer began with family double features and by fall 1969 the fare was adult double features. It was running again from November 1970 through February 1971 with 49 admissions for family friendly double features with kid shows on Saturdays that included ten cartoons. 

Closing: The last day of operation was evidently Tuesday February 16, 1971 with a double feature of "Sand Pebbles" and "The Undefeated." Thanks to William Miller for the research.

Status: It was demolished in 1973. The theatre address is now a parking lot for the church at 2155 Atlantic.
 

An interior view: 

 Thanks to Lou Rugani for locating this trade magazine photo for a post on Cinema Treasures.  


More exterior views:

1933 - A post-quake view from the collection of the Historical Society of Long Beach. It appears on the Cal State Long Beach page about the Brayton Theatre.
 
 
 
1933 - Thanks to the Ronald W. Mahan Collection for sharing this photo of the rebuilt theatre's new streamline look. "Baby Face" with Barbara Stanwyck and "Midnight Club" with Clive Brook and George Raft were both July releases. There's a cropped version of the photo in the Los Angeles Public Library collection. 
 
 
 
1933 - A Mott Studios view with the theatre running William Wyler's "Her First Mate," an August release, along with with "Sunset Pass," a Randolph Scott western. You can join the Signal Tarzan Club! The photo is in the California State Library collection.


 
1973 - A photo taken by Matt Spero during demolition. He notes at the time they had already knocked down the side walls. Thanks, Matt! 
 

 
2015 - The parking lot next to the church was once the site of the Brayton. Photo: Google Maps

More information: See the Brayton Theatre page on Cinema Treasures. Cinema Tour also has a page on the theatre but there's nothing much on it. Cal State Long Beach also has a page has a page on the Brayton.

| back to top | Long Beach: survey page | Long Beach: alphabetical list | Along the Coast | Along the Coast: theatre list by address | Downtown L.A. | Westside | Hollywood | Westwood and Brentwood | [more] Los Angeles movie palaces | the main alphabetical list | theatre history resources | film and theatre tech resources | theatres in movies | LA Theatres on facebook | contact info | welcome and site navigation guide |

Byde-A-Wyle Theatre

 336 on the Pike Long Beach, CA 90802 | map |  

 
Opening: March 2, 1908 as an open-air legit venue called the Byde-A-Wyle. Thanks to Ronald W. Mahan for the data. It had a full stage but in this view perhaps taken during their first season they hadn't put a roof over it yet. On the left it's a slice of the Wonderland Theatre at 330 on the Pike, the house that would end up as the Gaiety Theatre. Thanks to Michelle Gerdes for locating this shot on eBay. The location was on the beach side of The Pike in the middle of the block between Cedar Walk and Chestnut Pl.
 
Seating capacity: Not known 
 
 
 
A detail from a 1908 Sanborn Map appearing courtesy of Ronald W. Mahan. The Pike is shown as the "Walk of a Thousand Lights." The Byde-A-Wyle is shown in blue over on the lower left. The Wonderland/Gaiety was a couple doors to the right of it. Also see a larger section of the map.
 
The Cal State Long Beach page about the Byde-A-Wyle notes that "Fatty" Arbuckle was playing summer stock for $50 a week in the 1908 season at the theatre. While in Long Beach he met and proposed to Minta Durfee. They were married by the Mayor, in a ticketed event, on the stage of the Byde-A-Wyle. The theatre was located east of the Virginia Hotel, where the wedding reception was held. The hotel, which opened in 1908, was located between Chestnut and Magnolia, south of Ocean Blvd.
 
 
 
A program for "The Wheel of Fortune," a presentation of the Byde-A-Wyle Musical Comedy Co. with
Roscoe Arbuckle and Minta Durfee. In the lower right they're advertising the August 5, 1908 "Society Night" wedding of the happy couple onstage. Tickets were 25, 50 and 75 cents. The program is from the Ronald W. Mahan Collection and can also be seen on the Cal State page "Early Long Beach Theatres and Cinemas: Burgeoning 'Hollywood,' The Pike and Theatre by the Sea." 
 
The September 11, 1909 issue of Southwest Contractor and Manufacturer noted: "It is represented that E. B. Campbell, S. L. Mack and A. Berheim of Bakersfield have purchased the Byde-A-Wyle theater and four lots and they will erect a new theater building." An item in the November 23, 1909 issue of the Los Angeles Daily Journal noted a contractor named J.W. Crane had secured a permit for $500 worth of repairs at the theatre. These items may represent a new auditorium being constructed with a roof.

In the 1909-1910 city directory it's listed as the Long Beach Theatre at 336 The Pike with Frank M. Clark as manager. There had been a Long Beach Theatre on Locust Ave. (about 5 blocks away) running c.1907-1908. It's unknown if that management was connected with this venue for the 1910 season.
 
By 1911 it was called the Unique Theatre with James C. Bray listed as the proprietor. The venue was soon renamed the Boston Theatre and is listed with that name in the 1912, 1913-14 and 1915-16 city directories with a 344 address. They goofed in the 1914-15 book and listed it as 433 The Pike. 
 
Closing: Perhaps sometime around 1916.
 
Status: It was demolished and replaced by other buildings.
 
 
An inside view: 


An undated interior look at the Byde-A-Wyle after they put a roof over it. Note the boxes on either side of the proscenium. Thanks to the Ronald W. Mahan Collection for sharing the image.
 
 
More exterior views:

c.1909 - A shot looking east that gives us views of all three theatres on the south side of the 300 block. The image of this postcard is from the Ronald W. Mahan Collection and makes an appearance on the Cal State Long Beach page about the Byde-A-Wyle. 

Just left of center it's the Wonderland's building. Two buildings to the left of it we get a side view of the clamshell entrance of the Art Theatre at 314. On the right the Byde-A-Wyle, now with a black structure seen in the upper right of the image. By this time they had put a roof on the venue. To the right of the entrance it's Wells & Co. Real Estate. They were listed as "on the Pike" in the 1908 city directory and with a 340 address in the 1909-1910 edition.
 
 
 
c.1915 - That red roofed structure with a stagehouse on the right side appears to be the Byde-A-Whyle -- or whatever it was called when the card was done. In the center is the Virginia Hotel. It's a card from the site Card Cow

 

 
c.1916 - "Best Vaudeville including pictures -- best acts available." The theatre had been renamed the Boston in this photo from the Ronald W. Mahan Collection. It appears on a Cal State Long Beach page they have for a later name for the Byde-A-Wyle, the Boston Theatre. We're looking at the west end of the building with the stage, facing Chestnut St. 
 

  
c.1922 - We're looking south across The Pike, most likely from the stagehouse of the Bentley Theatre.  The Byde-A-Wyle is gone. Its entrance had been in the center of the image with the auditorium stretching off to the right. The building that had housed the Wonderland/Gaiety is the one with the curvy mission-style parapet a bit left of center. Two buildings to the left of the Gaiety note the squat building with the reddish roof that used to be the Art Theatre at 314. Thanks to Michelle Gerdes for sharing this card from her collection.
 

 
c.1978 - The Byde-A-Wyle had once been in that location on the right. We're looking east east along The Pike from Chestnut Pl. Thanks to Rick Warren for sharing his photo on Flickr. Also see the 26 photos in Rick's "Pike Amusement Park" album and the 144 great views in his "Old Long Beach Buildings" album. 
 
The top of the facade of the building once housing the Gaiety Theatre at 330 can be seen with the curvy parapet just beyond the "Penny Arcade" sign. That imposing building on the left is on the site of the Joyland Theatre, once at 335. 

 
 
2019 - In this view we're looking south on Chestnut Pl. with Seaside Way seen on the right. The 300 block of The Pike once ended here. The Byde-A-Wyle's stage was once about where the garage entrance now is. Photo: Google Maps 
 
More information: There isn't any more at the moment about the Byde-A-Wyle. 
 
The pages about the Gaiety, Tarrytown and the Joyland have additional views of the 300 block between Cedar Walk and Chestnut Pl. 

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