Visit the Los Angeles Theatres Facebook page for news about L.A.'s historic
theatres and see what's been added to the various web pages recently.

We now have an events calendar listing interesting upcoming shows and tours in historic theatres.
You can click on any of the photos in these posts for a larger view.

Events Calendar Spring 2014

A few events coming up in the historic theatres of Los Angeles that might be of interest:

APRIL 2014

Wednesday April 23 - United Artists/Theatre at Ace Hotel -  Cinespia presents "Tron" (1982).  Doors at 7:30 pm, movie at 8 pm.
| on Cinespia's website |
| our web pages about the UA |


Friday, April 25 -- The Wiltern - Lebowski Fest. Don't think there will be bowling, but probably everything else.
| the announcement on Facebook |
our Wiltern web page |


Saturday, April 26 - Million Dollar Theatre 8:00 pm -- Vintage Los Angeles presents Orson Welles' "Touch of Evil" (1958) the first of a noir film series.
| the invite on Facebook | trailer |
| our Million Dollar web pages |


MAY 2014

Saturday, May 24 - Los Angeles Theatre -- Myth Masque, a fantasy event.
| the event on Facebook |
| our Los Angeles Theatre web pages |


JUNE 2014

Wednesday June 11 - Los Angeles Theatre - 8 pm - L.A. Conservancy's Last Remaining Seats series presents "The Lady Eve" (1941).
| tickets and full series schedule |
| our web pages on the Los Angeles Theatre |



Saturday June 14 - Dorothy Chandler Pavilion - 8 pm - L.A. Conservancy's Last Remaining Seats series presents "West Side Story" (1961).
| tickets and full series schedule |
| our web page on the Dorothy Chandler |



Wednesday June 18 - Orpheum Theatre - 8 pm - L.A. Conservancy's Last Remaining Seats series presents "Footlight Parade" (1933).
| tickets and full series schedule |
| our web pages on the Orpheum Theatre |



Saturday June 21 - United Artists/Theatre at Ace Hotel   - 2 pm and 8 pm - L.A. Conservancy's Last Remaining Seats series presents "Back to the Future" (1985).  8pm SOLD OUT
| tickets and full series schedule |
| our web pages about the UA |



Wednesday June 25 - Palace Theatre - 8 pm - - L.A. Conservancy's Last Remaining Seats series presents Luis Buñuel's "El gran calavera" (1949). English title: "The Great Madcap."
| tickets and full series schedule |
| our web pages about the Palace Theatre |



Saturday June 29 - Orpheum Theatre - 2 and 8 pm - L.A. Conservancy's Last Remaining Seats series presents "Citizen Kane" (1941).
| tickets and full series schedule |
| our web pages on the Orpheum Theatre

 

JULY 2014

July 9 - 19 - Downtown Film Festival - various venues
| the event website |


Do you know of an event that should be listed?
Send me an e-mail:
-- Bill Counter  counterb@gmail.com



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visit Los Angeles Theatres on Facebook |



The Belasco / Follies Theatre















This postcard view gives us a vista north on Main St. toward the Belasco (on the left) at 337 S. Main. The card, a find of Ken McIntyre on the Facebook page Photos of Los Angeles, is a pre-1913 view as by that time the theatre had been renamed the Republic. By 1919 it was called the Follies, the name it would stick with.  It opened in 1904, a design of A.M. Edelman, and stuck around until 1974. See our Follies Theatre page for many more views.

The Liberty Theatre






















The Liberty opened in 1911 at 266 S. Main St. Seen here in a lovely postcard view from the Theatre Posts collection of Cezar Del Valle, this 5 cent theatre was one of about 50 theatres that were on Main at one time or another. The Architect was A.C. Martin, whose firm is still in business doing major projects in Los Angeles.  See our page on the Liberty Theatre for more data.


The Burbank Theatre














Not in Burbank but on Main St. downtown. It was built for Dr. David Burbank who was also the namesake of the San Fernando Valley town.

Here we get a colorized postcard view of a c.1905 photo. It appears on Brent Dickerson's Main Street (Part Two) page of his Visit To Old Los Angeles.  Check it out for a nice tour down the street.  It's just one of many great adventures on his website.  See our page on the Burbank Theatre (now demolished) for lots more about the building.

The Ravenna Theatre
















The Ravenna, which opened in 1925, was at 233 N. Vermont Ave. This Spanish style 798 seat neighborhood theatre was a design by Richard D. King for the Chotiner circuit. The photo comes from a February 1928 article in Motion Picture News about theatres decorated by the Robert Powers Studios. See the listing on the main page of our [more] L.A. Movie palaces site for more on the Ravenna Theatre, sadly demolished in the 80s.


More by Richard D. King:
Hermosa Theatre, Hermosa Beach (1923)
Symphony Theatre, Compton (1924)
Fox La Brea
, 857 S. La Brea (1926)
Lomita Theatre, Lomita (alterations, 1925)
Fox Parisian, 803 S. Vermont (alterations, 1930)


The Fox Westwood Village
















 The Fox Westwood, now known as the Regency Village Theatre, opened in 1931 as a joint venture between Janss Development, the developers of the area, and Fox West Coast Theatres. The photo is one from the Los Angeles Public Library. The theatre was designed by Percy Parke Lewis, evidently his only theatre project.   See our page on the Fox Westwood for many more views.

The Carthay Circle Theatre






















The Carthay Circle opened in 1925, a project of West Coast Theatres and a real estate developer promoting his new subdivision south of Wilshire near Beverly Hills.  The theatre, seen here in a Mott Studio photo from the California State Library, was designed by Dwight Gibbs. The Carthay, always a classy venue for premieres, got its proscenium gutted for a big TODD-AO screen in 1956. National General Corporation, the successor to Fox West Coast, tore it down in 1969 for an office building on the site. Many more views of the building are on our Carthay Circle page.

Also by Dwight Gibbs:
Mesa Theatre, Costa Mesa (1948)
Vagabond Theatre, 2511 Wilshire (1950) -- Gibbs did the conversion of the 1926 legit venue Masque Theatre (Morgan, Walls & Clements) into a movie theatre. It was later known as the Hayworth.


The Fox Redondo


















The Fox in Redondo Beach was a design by John Paxton Perrine.  The auditorium view is a photo in the collection of the Los Angeles Public Library.  The theatre, at Diamond and Pacific, was right on the beach. Opened in 1929, it closed in 1972 and was demolished the next year for a hotel project that fizzled. See our page on the Fox Redondo for more information.

Also by John Paxton Perrine:
Lincoln Theatre, 2300 S. Central  (1927)

The Cinema Treasures page on John Paxton Perrine lists
these other  southern California theatres in California as his work:
California, San Diego
California, San Bernardino
Capital, Calexico
Fox, El Centro
Orange, Orange
Ritz, San Bernardino


The Ambassador Theatre

















The Ambassador Theatre, as well as the rest of the Ambassador Hotel at 3400 Wilshire Blvd., was a design of prominent architect Myron Hunt. The theatre opened in 1921 and was still running films occasionally into the 50s. The photo is from the collection of the Los Angeles Public Library.  See our page on the Ambassador for more about the theatre.

Also by Myron Hunt:
Ricardo Montalban Theatre (Wilkes Vine St.), Hollywood (1927) - with H.C. Chambers

The Dome Theatre






















The Dome at the head of the Ocean Park pier opened in 1925. Actually this design by Clifford A. Balch was the second Dome -- a replacement for one that had burned in  the 1924 pier fire. The photo comes from the December 28, 1929 issue of Motion Picture News, part of a spread on various Fox West Coast Theatres.   The Dome's building got repurposed as a ride at Pacific Ocean Park and later was demolished. See our page on the two Dome Theatres for many more photos.


The Fox Pomona


















The Fox, which opened in 1931, was a design of Clifford A. Balch. The theatre has now been restored and operates as a concert venue and banquet facility with several different areas including a ballroom in what was the top half of the stagehouse. The photo here, in the collection of the Huntington Digital Library, is by Doug White for the Southern California Edison Co. See our Fox Pomona page for lots more in the theatre.

The Golden Gate Theatre

















The luscious Golden Gate Theatre opened in 1927, a design by the prolific Clifford A. Balch.  The 1,345 seat house in East Los Angeles had a full stage and was running films well into the 80s. Originally entered via a courtyard behind buildings fronting on Atlantic Blvd. and Whittier Blvd., the theatre itself stood alone after the other buildings were demolished following the 1987 earthquake. The photo is from the collection of the Los Angeles Public Library. See our page on the Golden Gate for many photos. Sadly, it's now a CVS drug store.

A few more by Clifford Balch:
Boulevard Theatre, 4549 Whittier Blvd. (1923, 1937 remodel)
Dome Theatre, Ocean Park (1925) 
Fox Theatre, Pomona (1931)
Four Star, 5112 Wilshire (c.1931) - with Walker & Eisen
United Artists, Long Beach (c.1931) - with Walker & Eisen
United Artists, Inglewood (1931) - with Walker & Eisen
United Artists, East L.A. (c.1931) - with Walker & Eisen
United Artists, Pasadena (1931) - with Walker & Eisen
   [ Balch also worked with Walker & Eisen on United Artists Theatres in El Centro and Berkeley. ]
Los Feliz Theatre, 1822 N. Vermont Ave. (1934)
Esquire Theatre, 419 N. Fairfax Ave. (1937)
El Rey Theatre, 5515 Wilshire Blvd. (1937)
La Mar, Manhattan Beach (1938)
Gordon/Showcase Theatre, 614 N. La Brea Ave. (1938)
5th Avenue Theatre, Inglewood (1939)
Magnolia Theatre, Burbank (1940)

See the listing for Clifford Balch on the Pacific Coast Architecture Database.


The Music Box Theatre


















The Music Box, at 6126 Hollywood Blvd. opened in 1926 as a showcase for revues staged by Carter DeHaven. It's a design by the prolific firm of Morgan, Walls and Clements. This proscenium view is a Mott Studios photo in the California State Library collection. See our Music Box/Fonda Theatre page for more information -- the theatre is alive and well as a concert venue.

The Imperial Theatre



















Long Beach's Imperial Theatre was dwarfed by its next door neighbor on Ocean Blvd. the West Coast. Both were operated by Fox West Coast and are now demolished. The Imperial, opened in 1926, was a design by Lewis A. Smith who did lots of other projects for the circuit. The photo comes from a 1929 Motion Picture News story about theatres that were decorated by Robert Powers Studios. See our Imperial Theatre page for more information about this lost theatre.  There's now a hotel on the site.


The Fox Uptown Theatre


















The Uptown, at 1008 S. Western Ave., was a 1926 design by Lewis A. Smith for West Coast Theatres. The location, 5 blocks south of Wilshire, later put it into competition with the Warner Bros. Wiltern Theatre at Wilshire and Western. The photo, from the Los Angeles Public Library collection, dates from the early 40s after the house had been given a Fox West Coast re-do. See our page on the Fox Uptown for more views. The 1700 seat theatre was demolished in the 60s.


The Rialto Theatre


















The Rialto, at 1023 Fair Oaks Ave. in South Pasadena, was designed by Lewis A. Smith for C.L. Langley, whose theatres soon became part of the growing West Coast Theatres chain. The Rialto opened in 1925 and in its later exhibition years was a revival house for Landmark Theatres. They still have a lease but closed the operation in 2007. There's a preservation effort afoot but progress has been slow. The 30s photo comes from the Friends of the Rialto Facebook page that's curated by Escott O. Norton. See our page on the Rialto Theatre for more information and photos.


The Fox Belmont Theatre


















The Fox Belmont was one of a number of similarly sized houses designed for West Coast Theatres by Lewis A Smith. The theatre, at 126 S. Vermont, had a full stage and 1680 seats. The photo of the theatre in its opening year, 1926, is from the Los Angeles Public Library. It closed after a fire in 1973 and was demolished shortly after that. Our page on the Fox Belmont has more photos.


The Fox Ritz Theatre


















The Ritz, on Wilshire Blvd. near La Brea, was a 1926 theatre with 1,660 seats designed by Lewis A. Smith. After its regular exhibition days were over it was a private screening room for Michael Todd and later even had a fling with legit theatre. The photo is an early view from the Los Angeles Public Library. The building was demolished in 1966.  See our page on the Fox Ritz for more photos.


The Olympic Theatre






















The Olympic Theatre opened in 1927 downtown at 313 W. 8th St. as Bard's 8th St. Theatre. Architect Lewis A. Smith, who designed a conversion from a building that had been a restaurant, died in 1926 so he didn't get to see it open. The auditorium, seen here in a photo from Hillsman Wright of the Los Angeles Historic Theatre Foundation, has quite a few features intact although the floor has been leveled and the place largely used for retail in recent years. See our three pages on the Olympic Theatre for more photos.


The Beverly Theatre


















The Beverly, just north of Wilshire on Beverly Drive in Beverly Hills, was an exotic Chinese themed design by Lewis A. Smith that opened in 1925. The photo is from a 1928 issue of Motion Picture News about theatres decorated by Robert Powers Studio. See our page on the Beverly Theatre for more about the theatre. Sadly, after years as a clothing boutique and bank, the building was demolished in 2005.