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State Theatre: backstage

703 S. Broadway Los Angeles, CA 90014  | map |

The State Theatre pages: history | vintage exterior views | recent exterior views | ticket lobby | lobbies and lounges | vintage auditorium views | recent auditorium views | projection booth | backstage | basement cafeteria |


The auditorium from centerstage. Thanks to Mike Hume for his April 2018 photo. Visit his Historic Theatre Photography site for tech info and hundreds of fine photos of the many theatres he's explored. And don't miss his page on the State Theatre.



The view from upstage right. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018


Proscenium width: 48' 9"

Proscenium height: about 34' at center.

Stage depth: 27' 6" from smoke pocket to back wall.

Apron depth: 58" from smoke pocket to lip.

Centerline to SL wall: 48'  Obstructions: 2nd floor dressing rooms overhang the wing space for the offstage 10' 5". There's also a dumpster enclosure upstage left and dressing room stairs downstage left.

Centerline to SR pinrail/lockrail: 31'

Grid height: 70' ?

Grid access: Via ladder from either stage left or stage right on the stair landing between the 3rd floor and the flyfloor.

Basement and dressing room access: Stairs are located downstage left and upstage right.

Loading door: Currently there isn't one. The area upstage left where the door into the alley was is now occupied by a concrete block enclosure for a dumpster.

Traps: There's no evidence that the center portion of the stage was ever trapped. There may be a trap SL below the trunk door areas but it's not visible either from onstage or in the basement.

Orchestra pit: Width is 9 1/2' from apron lip to the downstage edge at center plus 3' back under the apron. The length is approximately 48'. Currently the pit is covered with removable plywood panels. Access is via stairs in the basement stage left. There was neither a pit lift nor an organ lift.

Asbestos: Operated stage left with a lattice track arbor up against the wall near the proscenium. The curtain is painted with a fanciful design that looks like it's out of a science fiction movie. The upstage side of the smoke pocket is 6 1/2" from the proscenium plasterline. The offstage edge of the pocket is 41" from the proscenium.

Flyfloors: Both stage left and stage right, 27' 10" above stage floor. They're above the third floor dressing rooms. Access either side is via stairs up from the third floor dressing rooms. Originally the State was a hemp house.

Counterweight system: It's an Armstrong-Power system with arbors tracked both front and back. Operation is stage right at at stage level. It's in two sections separated for access to the dressing rooms and the stage door. The sets are operated from the offstage side of the lockrail. Behind the lockrail there's walking space to get to the dimmerboard and stage door downstage and the stairs upstage going to the basement and upstairs dressing rooms. Not counting the asbestos and the lambrequin, there are 21 sets currently rigged.

Downstage linesets:
-- No lockrail - each of the sets has a separate tension block/ropelock. Measurements are the distance from the smoke pocket. Sets are operated from the offstage side.
#1 - 23" - 56" high arbor - wire guide using aircraft cable
#2 - 48" - 
#3 - 58" - labeled "gold curtain"
#4 - 66" - screen frame - the arbor is on the flyfloor

-- Upstage of set #4 there's a gap for a passage offstage. There is no set #5.

Upstage counterweight battery:
-- Pinrail: on the onstage side of the battery
-- Ropelock location: on the offstage side of the arbors
-- Line spacing: 6" centers
-- Batten length: 56' typical with 5 lift lines
-- Arbor height: varies but typically there's 79" of space for weights.
-- Set capacity: about 550 lbs. beyond tare weight.
-- Weight size: 3 1/2" x 11"  The amount of weight available is not known.
-- Measurements are the distance of the T-track from the smoke pocket. The actual position of the lift line sheaves was not surveyed.
#6 - 10'6" - separate ropelock - not part of the lockrail
#7 -  11' - separate ropelock - not part of the lockrail
#8 - 11' 6"
#9 - 12' - no batten
#10 - 12' 6" - no batten
#11 - 13'
---- 13' 6" - no track
#12 - 14'
#13 - 14' 6" - no arbor
#14 - 15' - no arbor
#15 - 15' 6"
#16 - 16'
#17 - 16' 6" - no batten
#18 - 17'
#19 - 17' 6"
#20 - 18' - no batten
----  18' 6" - no track
#21 - 19'
#22 - 19' 6" - no batten
#23 - 20"
#24 - 20' 6"
#25 - 21'
#26 - 21' 6"
#27 - 22' - no batten
#28 - 22' 6" - no batten
#29 - 23'
---- 23' 6" - no track
#30 - 24' - no batten
#31 -24' 6"
#32 - 25' - no batten
#33 - 25' 6"

Lattice track counterweight sets on SR flyfloor: There are four sets arrayed along the SR wall. Set A is presumably the lambrequin, downstage of the asbestos. Set B is the movie screen operated at stage level via a run of 1/4" aircraft cable connected to a purchase line at ropelock #4 down at stage level. Set C has no arbor, set D has an arbor but no load.

Loading bridge: Access is via a ladder down from the grid. Weight capacity is unknown.

Torm lighting positions: There are crow's-nest type platforms anchored to the proscenium wall both stage left and stage right up 11' 9" from the stage. These once served as access to a lighting bridge in the first electric position. The stage right platform is right up against the offstage edge of the smoke pocket. SL is 47" farther offstage. Both platforms stick out 39" from the proscenium wall and are 54" long. 

Lighting control: The original resistance board is still in place downstage right. It's a Frank Adam board with some cross interlocking shafts but no pre-selective capability like the later models. The houselights were wired for three color circuits.

Company switches: None.

Basement access to house mix position: Not possible at present.

Balcony rail to stage center at curtain line: 50'. There is no pipe or circuitry installed.

Proscenium box to stage center at curtain line: 44' from upstage side.

Upper balcony exit walkway to stage center at curtain line: 69' from position nearest to the stage.

Booth followspot positions: None at present. Two spot ports on the house right side of the booth have been covered over and amp racks are in the way. 

Projection throw: Approximately 120'

Movie screen: Flat format picture is 18' 6" high x 33' 4" wide. Scope is 18' 6" high x 44' 6" wide. The frame is 31' high x 56' wide.

Stage door: At the end of the exit passageway SR that's between the theatre and the office building. It can be accessed via the office building lobby. From the auditorium one can get backstage by going out a side exit house left to get to the passage.

Dressing rooms. There's space easily for 60 performers plus musicians. There is no backstage elevator.
-- Stage level: nothing
-- Basement SL: two dressing rooms for 5 performers each plus another small room are along the offstage side of the SL corridor. A kitchen that used to be a 3 person dressing room and a toilet room are along the onstage side of the corridor. Downstage there's one room for 2 near the orchestra pit stairs and a musicians' area under the pit. Just upstage of the orchestra pit stairs there's a large room (that used to be two) suitable for chorus, catering or wardrobe. 
-- Basement SR: one room for 3 and one room for 6 are on the offstage side of the SR corridor. There's a toilet room with a sink on the upstage end of the corridor. A chorus room downstage has space for 16.
-- 2nd floor SL: A room with space for 3 performers downstage with a toilet room nearby. Heading upstage from the stairs there's a room for 2 followed by a larger room for perhaps 5. There's a trunk door opening onto the stage.
-- 3rd floor SL: A room for 3 downstage with a toilet room nearby. Heading upstage in the corridor there are three rooms for 2 performers each. A trunk door is in the corridor.
-- 2nd floor SR: From the upstage stairs there are three rooms along the corridor for 2 performers each. There's another room for 2 downstage plus a toilet room nearby.
-- 3rd floor SR: From the upstage stairs there are three rooms along the corridor for 2 performers each. Downstage it's a newish shower room plus a room with toilet and sink nearby.

Prop room: Downstage left, under the proscenium box area. There's also quite a bit of space behind the dimmerboard for electrical or sound storage.

Production / carpenter's office: Nothing on stage level. Lots of space to commandeer in the basement.

Wardrobe and catering: Lots of space in the basement under the stage including a large shop/storage area upstage that runs between the SL and SR corridors. Currently there are no washers or dryers. The other large basement spaces include the chorus dressing room downstage right of center and a similarly sized room left of center near the stairs to the pit. 

Organ chambers: Located high above the proscenium box areas. Access to the house right chamber is via stairs up from the proscenium box then a short ladder. For house left you exit the downstage end of the third floor dressing room corridor into the exit passageway between the theatre and office building. There's a ladder up to a ledge where you can get a second short ladder up to the organ chamber door. The organ itself is long gone. It was a 3/18 Moller initially, later replaced by a Style 235 Wurlitzer. 


Stage left:


The view across from centerstage. The concrete block structure was done to provide an enclosure for a dumpster. The loading door into the alley was formerly in the wall beyond that. Note the trunk doors on the 2nd and 3rd levels and the flyfloor above. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018 



An earlier upstage view when the church's set was still in place. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Upstage left. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



An alley view of the loading door area. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



A look up at the trunk doors. Thanks to Claudia Mullins for this and her other April 2018 photos appearing here. They're part of a 46 photo State Theatre Tour set on Facebook that she took during the Los Angeles Historic Theatre Foundation "all-about" tour of the building. 

The LAHTF is active in promoting awareness of the historic theatres of Los Angeles and works toward their preservation. They frequently offer tours and sponsor other events related to historic preservation. www.lahtf.org | group Facebook page | official Facebook page



Across from downstage right. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018



Looking to stage left behind the screen. The occasion was the June 2, 2018 L.A. Conservancy "Last Remaining Seats" screening of Mr. Smith Goes to Washington," the first show in the theatre in 20 years. Photo: Mike Hume.



A view from downstage. The door at the left goes into the prop room. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018



A look across with the screen in. Photo: Bill Counter - June 2018



At the left a peek into the prop room, located below the proscenium box. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018



A closer look at the sign on the door. Well, it looks like somebody did cut the rope. But it's the wrong rope. This is the purchase line to operate the asbestos curtain, not the rope to cut in case of emergency. Photo: Claudia Mullins - April 2018



In the prop room. That's the organ windline in the corner. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



Pin connectors on the smoke pocket. At the bottom of the image it's an outlet from the theatre's house vacuum system. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018



Downstage left. The alley is beyond that wall. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



An earlier view of the downstage left stairs. The church had sealed off the basement access with the door and drywall. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014  


2nd floor dressing rooms stage left:


The dressing room room downstage of the proscenium on the 2nd floor, originally for 3 performers. There's a toilet room next door. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



A door in the corridor opposite the stairs gets you out on the platform that once was access to the light bridge. On the left that's a bit of the arbor for the asbestos curtain. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



Looking upstage from the stairs. Photo: Bill Counter - June 2018



Upstage of the stairs there are just two rooms. This is the first one, a room that was originally set up for 2 performers.  Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



The room at the upstage end of the corridor. There's been a remodel. The room has been enlarged to include what was formerly corridor space. There's a trunk door out of the frame to the left. Around to the right beyond the shelves it's an exit to the fire escape in the alley. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



The view out the trunk door of the upstage room on the 2nd floor. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018


3rd floor dressing rooms stage left:  

 
In the corridor looking upstage. The stairs continue up to the flyfloor. The ladder at the right goes to the grid. On the right side there are three rooms, each for 2 performers. At the end of the corridor note the trunk door on the left. Around the corner to the right is an exit onto the fire escape in the alley. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018



A peek into the first room upstage of the stairs. The window will give you an alley view onto the roof of the retail building to the west that from 1916 until 1921 was a theatre called Palace of Pictures. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



The dressing room downstage of the proscenium, originally for 3 performers. The doorway next door is to a toilet room. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018


The flyfloor stage left:


The view upstage on the flyfloor. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



Looking toward the proscenium wall. The opening at flyfloor level just beyond the stairs is to a storage area. The upper doorway gets you into the organ chamber. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018  



The downstage end of the pinrail. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018


 
The storage area on the house side of the firewall. The bricked-in opening used to be access to relamp the niches that are above the proscenium box area and below the organ chambers. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



The opening into the organ chamber. The ladder continues on to the grid. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018



The stage left end of the grid. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018

Stage right: 


Looking across to stage right. Thanks to Wendell Benedetti for his April 2018 photo. It's one in a great nineteen photo set that's on the LAHTF Facebook page. They were mostly taken during a Los Angeles Historic Theatre Foundation "all-about" tour of the building.



The view across with the screen in. Photo: Bill Counter - June 2018



Looking downstage. That's just a pinrail we're looking at, not ropelocks. The counterweight system is unusual in that it's operated from the offstage side of the arbors. Originally the house was just hemp with the counterweight system being a later addition. Note the trunk door on the second floor that's now blocked by the upstage linesets. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018



A view of the T-wall when the church had everything interesting backstage either caged or walled off. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Downstage right. The cages were added by the church tenant that was in the building for twenty years ending in early 2018. The dimmerboard is beyond that downstage cage. The passageway between the two groups of linesets leads to the stage door downstage and the dressing room stairs upstage. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018



The downstage end of the pinrail/lockrail. Photo: Bill Counter - June 2018



A pinrail detail. Yes, the ropelocks are over there on the offstage side of the arbors. It's an Armstrong-Power system. Note that the arbors are tracked both front and back. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018 



A view from upstage. No, that's not an especially stubby arbor in the foreground. The tops of these float. This one has slid down the rods as there isn't any load attached. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



Downstage right rigging and stairs. That platform (with a lineset running through it) was used for access to a long-gone light bridge in the first electric position. The white stuff is some of the church's set and added drywall. At the right is a bit of the T-track for several downstage linesets. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Downstage between the proscenium and the dimmerboard. This recess is currently plastered over on the house side. In 1921 it was an annunciator to display cards announcing the vaudeville acts. Later it became an enclosure for PA speakers. There's no answer about the rocks left behind by the church. Perhaps they were offering hot stone massage? Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



A portion of the dimmerboard revealed behind a door added by the church. The big lever on the right is the master for the stage side of the board. On the left is the house master, the three house color masters and some of the handles for the individual house light dimmers. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018



The stage side of the board. The usual practice was to put this closest to the proscenium, but here it's on the offstage end. Although we have four rows of dimmers, the stage lighting positions were wired for only three colors. The bottom row is just for floor pockets and other stage receptacles. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



A closer look at part of the stage end of the board. The upper two rows of dimmers with the fancier handles could be interlocked to one of two shafts that rotated in opposite directions. Thus as the master lever is pulled down, some dimmers could come up while others went down. Interestingly, we didn't get this feature for the blue dimmers or the dimmers at the bottom for the pockets. Photo: Claudia Mullins - April 2018



Looking into the onstage end of the dimmerboard. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018  


 
Behind the dimmer board. The door for access is on the offstage end, on the far left. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018



Looking upstage behind the lockrail.  The white doors and the cage were added by the church tenant. It's unknown what the brick enclosure is hiding. Behind it are the stairs to the basement and upstairs dressing rooms Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018 



The view out to the stage between sections of the counterweight system. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



A portion of the lockrail for the upstage sets. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



The view from behind the caged linesets downstage. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



Tension blocks and ropelocks downstage. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



The downstage ropelocks after they got uncaged. Photo: Bill Counter - June 2018



Looking downstage behind the lockrail. The stage door, leading to the east exit passageway, is just around the corner to the right of the dimmerboard. The stairs to the basement or upstairs are behind us and off to the right. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018


In the east exit passageway:


The exit passageway stage right. We're looking north along the east side of the auditorium from backstage. This area was an open-air space between the theatre and office building that later got roofed over. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



The exit doors heading out into the office building lobby. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018  



Looking back toward the stage end of the passage. The open door is a house left exit from the auditorium. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



A peek up above the added roof. It's the office building on the left. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018


2nd floor dressing rooms stage right:


On the stairs upstage right looking at the now-blocked second floor trunk door. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018



Down the corridor. On the left at the end the door gets you out onto the platform that had once been light bridge access. At the end where the turquoise lockers are it's a room for 2 performers. Out of the frame to its right is a toilet room. Beyond that is an exit door leading to a fire escape in the exit passageway between the theatre and the office building. On the right side of the corridor are three rooms suitable for 2 performers each. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



Another look down the corridor. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



A peek in the first room downstage of the stairs. Evidently the church didn't like the mirrors and lights that were there. That's a medicine cabinet they hung on the wall. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



The second room, originally for 2 performers. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



The third room, again for 2 performers. Seen enough dressing rooms yet? Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



A peek out onto the platform that once served as access to a lighting bridge. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018



Looking upstage from the platform. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



On the left, a bit of the locker room at the end of the corridor, downstage of the proscenium. It was originally a dressing room for 2 performers. Taking a jump to the right there's a toilet room just around the corner and, a few feet farther along, the downstage exit. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



The exit onto the fire escape in the east exit passageway, between the theatre and the office building. The stairs go up to a landing at the 3rd floor level. There's a ladder down to the first floor but you have to slide open a hatch to get through the roof that's been added to the passsageway. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



Looking back upstage toward the stairs. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



On the stairs to the 3rd floor. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018


3rd floor stage right:


Along the corridor downstage from the stairs. On the right there are three rooms with space for 2 performers each. At the end it's a newish shower room. Take a right at the corner and there's a room with toilet and sink as well as an exit. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



The first room downstage of the stairs. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018 



The second room. More of the same. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018  



The third room. Yes, another medicine chest on the wall. What was the church going to do? Stage a big musical? Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018  



At the jog at the proscenium wall. At the left, a look into a shower room. Around the bend it's a room with toilet and sink plus the exit to the fire escape beyond. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018 



On the fire escape at the 3rd floor level. We're looking down to the 2nd floor and the edge of the roof above the first floor level. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018


The flyfloor stage right: 


On the stairs between the 3rd floor and the flyfloor. That ladder will take you the rest of the way to the grid. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



The view toward the proscenium from the top of the stairs. The window at the far right gets you a scenic view into the airshaft between the theatre and the office building. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



Another look downstage. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018  



The storage area downstage of the proscenium wall. The bricked-in opening once gave you access to the lit niches below the organ grille. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



The sidewall as we look upstage. The ladder to the grid is hiding back there in the corner. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018

There are four lattice track counterweight sets arrayed along the sidewall. Set A, out of the frame to the left, is presumably for the lambrequin, downstage of the asbestos. Set B, the big guy at the left, is for the screen frame. It's operated from stage level via Ropelock #4. Set C, seen in the middle of the photo is just track -- no arbor. Set D, the farthest upstage, has an arbor but no load rigged to it. Perhaps it was originally a cyc. 



Another look upstage. The arbor on the left is for the screen frame. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018



The stage right end of the grid. That whitish thing is a loading bridge. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



A closer look at the loading bridge. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018


The stage basement:


The stairs to the basement upstage right. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



At the left it's the end of an upstage shop/storage area that runs across to meet the SL corridor. At the right it's a toilet area. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



The upstage shop/storage area from stage right. The wall at the end was added by the church. There's a restroom beyond. Beyond that you hit the SL corridor that runs upstage/downstage. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018 



Looking downstage in the SR corridor. On the left it's the toilet room. On the offstage side of the corridor is a room for three performers followed by a larger room. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



A peek into the first dressing room downstage of the stairs. It used to be a room for three performers. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



Downstage on the offstage side of the SR corridor is this room with space for 6 performers that's had a bit of a remodel. That horizontal item on the right wall used to have hooks for costumes on it. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



We're downstage. At the end of the SR corridor taking a left gets you to this chorus room with space for 16 performers. Through the doorway toward stage left we're in another similarly sized room. That's the back side of the stairs up to the pit we see through the door. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018 



Downstage left in a room that used to be two. Note the line of a wall on the floor. Out the doorway at the end and you hit the stage left corridor. Or take a right and you've got the stairs up to the orchestra pit. There were originally lights and mirrors on both the far wall and the one behind us and what looks like plumbing for a number of sinks out of the frame to the right.  Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



A hatch to get to the space between the ceiling and the stage floor. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



Downstage left looking toward stage center in a little corridor leading to the pit stairs. Behind us is the SL corridor and the stairs downstage left. On the extreme left is a small dressing room or office. On the right the doorway with the steel stud showing goes to the room seen in the previous two photos. The door on the left opposite it goes to a musicians' area under the pit. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



Looking into the musicians' area under the pit. The wall at left follows the line of the orchestra pit above. There's been some church-installed drywall so it's difficult to tell if there was originally access from here to other basement areas. The lit doorway leads to a skinny room that was perhaps the music library. The door at the right goes to a toilet area. Photo: Bill Counter - June 2018



The landing at the orchestra pit entrance. We're left of the stage centerline. Photo: Mike Hume - April 2018



The downstage left stairs up to the stage. The SL corridor is to our left. The doorway on the right leads to a storage room on the house side of the firewall. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



The storage room adjacent to the stairs. That's the organ windline in the upper left of the photo. The door leads to the former location of the organ blower. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



The organ blower room. Photo: Bill Counter - June 2018



Looking back out to the corridor. Photo: Bill Counter - June 2018



Looking upstage along the SL corridor. On the left it's a kitchen and then a toilet room. On the right is a small dressing room or office we're peeking into followed by two partially deconstructed dressing rooms with space for five performers each. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



The kitchen on the onstage side of the SL corridor. It used to be a room for 3 performers. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



The toilet room on the onstage side of the SL corridor. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



Looking upstage at what had been two dressing rooms for 5 performers each on the offstage side of the SL corridor. The church was in the middle of a renovation project when they left. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018


The view back down the corridor from upstage. At the end of the corridor note the stairs up to stage level on the left.  Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



Some church construction on the onstage side at the upstage end of the SL corridor. That's the building's back wall on the right. The upstage shop/storage area is through the doorway. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



Looking back offstage toward the SL corridor. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018



In the upstage shop/storage area, looking across to stage right. Photo: Bill Counter - April 2018

Early stage comments: A December 3, 1921 article in Exhibitors Trade Review mentioned the technical wonders of the State: "The new Loew [sic] State Theatre, which opened in Los Angeles Nov. 12 has a screen 24 by 44 1/2 feet. It is twice the size of any other screen in use in that city and pictures are furnished for it by what is said to be the largest projection booth in the world...

"The stage curtain weighs 1100 lb., and is made of velour. Special scene shifting apparatus makes it possible by means of pulleys to whisk the medallions from the stage floor in a few seconds. The stage can be changed from three to fifty feet in size instantly." Thanks to Cezar Del Valle for the research. He has excerpts from the article in a Theatre Talks blog post. The page with the full article can be seen on Internet Archive.

The State Theatre pages: history | vintage exterior views | recent exterior views | ticket lobby | lobbies and lounges | vintage auditorium views | recent auditorium views | projection booth | back to top - backstage | basement cafeteria |

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