Start your Los Angeles area historic theatre explorations by heading to one of these major sections:
| Downtown | Hollywood | Westside | Westwood/Brentwood | Along the Coast | [more] L.A. Movie Palaces |
To see what's recently been added to the mix visit the Theatres in Movies site and the Los Angeles Theatres Facebook page.

Globe Theatre: backstage

744 S. Broadway Los Angeles, CA 90014 | map |

The Globe Theatre pages:  history | vintage exterior views | recent exterior views | lobby areas | recent auditorium views | earlier auditorium views | attic | backstage | basement | garland building |


The view into the auditorium from the stage. The floor was leveled in 1987 for use as a swapmeet. It's concrete on top of corrugated decking supported by steel trusses. The slab is about a foot above the original stage level. Thanks to Hunter Kerhart for his 2014 photo. Keep up with his recent explorations: on Facebook | HunterKerhart.com | on Flickr



Looking up from onstage. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014  



The auditorium from atop the alley entrance vestibule upstage. Until Erik Chol's renovations of 2014-2015 the alley was used as the entrance. At the time of the photo the building was just getting a basic cleanup before renovation work began. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2013



Up across the back of the 1913 asbestos to the grid. Off left we see the pinrail on the flyfloor. The T-track just right of the proscenium is for the fire curtain counterweights. Note the grid access ladders from the flyfloors both stage left and stage right. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2013



The back wall and the grid. That's a movie screen frame hanging downstage of the paint bridge. At the far right the white railing is a walkway going along the top dressing room floor. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2013


Stage depth: 28' 9 1/2" from the smoke pocket to face of the back wall columns.

Proscenium width: 38' 2"

Proscenium height: 34'

Apron: None anymore. The underside of the apron lip can still be viewed in the covered orchestra pit.

Wing space stage left: 11' 8" from the proscenium to the dressing room wall (only 9' 7" from proscenium to a railing in front of the dressing rooms). The railing was added in front of a sloped ramp going down from the raised stage level to original floor height.

Wing space stage right: 20' 6" from proscenium to the face of the side wall columns.

Stagehouse wall to wall: Approximately 80'

Stagehouse construction: Reinforced concrete

Stage floor: Originally wood and trappable. It's been raised about a foot from its 1913 level and new plywood decking is covered with concrete. The stage area is now the same as the lobby level.

Dressing rooms: In the basement and stacked offstage left.

Dressing room access: Stairs downstage left. There used to be a spiral staircase downstage right. It's still there in the basement, but chopped off below stage floor level.

Rigging: It was primarily a hemp house with pinrails on both flyfloors. The standard set used 3 lift lines. Counterweighted wire guide sets (with wire rope lift lines) were used for the 5 electric battens. Several additional counterweighted sets, now removed, were downstage.

Fire Curtain: The original is still in place. The lattice track and operating line for the system are stage right.

Grid height: Erik Chol reports it as 80'.

Grid construction: Steel. The deck is 3' C channels set on edge. The headbeams are stage right.

Flyfloors:
Both stage left and stage right. The stage right area was the primary one.

Grid access: Downstage ladders from either flyfloor.

Orchestra pit: Still there but covered by the current concrete floor.

Stage Switchboard: Gone. It was downstage right.

Paint bridge: Across the backwall with access from either flyfloor.

Movie Screen: An empty frame is hanging upstage on the lineset that was used for the 4th electric.

Projection booth: It was installed in 1930 at the back of the first balcony. It's now gone.


Stage left:


Looking across the dressing room floors to the grid. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2013 



The proscenium wall stage left. The grey-looking bifurcated doorway goes to the stairs. The left side is to the basement. The right goes to the dressing rooms upstairs. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014

The red arch at center used to take you into the auditorium, now just to the proscenium boxes. The lower one is now half below floor level. There are stairs from there to the balcony level box. From there, it's a ladder up to the attic. 



Looking toward upstage left. The ramp is necessary as the stage was raised during the floor leveling of the 80s. It gets you down to the original stage/dressing room floor level. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014 

The yellow room, formerly a dressing room, was turned into an ADA compliant restroom during the club days. Off to the left beyond it is a walled off room that used to be the boxoffice for the second balcony patrons. There's a window out in the south exit passageway near the corner of the building.



Looking to stage left in the theatre's Club 740 days. The c.2008 photo appears courtesy of Ralph Verdugo, operator of the club at the time.



Dressing room levels 2 and 3 plus a bit of the house. Thanks to Ralph Verdugo for the c.2008 photo.



Looking into the house from upstage left. At the center we're looking through to some light from Broadway. Until Erik Chol came along that original lobby on Broadway had been used as retail space since 1987. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2013



Dressing room level 2. This used to be several small rooms plus a toilet area -- the walls have been removed. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



The view downstage from level 2. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014 



Upstage from level 2. That's a DJ booth above the alley entrance vestibule. Thanks to Rebecca Reynoso of Cap Equity Locations [323-375-4192] for this 2014 photo as well as the others appearing on these pages. The firm brokers deals between property owners and those looking for filming locations or other special uses. Their Globe Theatre page has 60 photos to browse through.



The DJ booth in action during the January 2017 "Night on Broadway" event. Thanks to Mike Hume for his photo. Head to his Historic Theatre Photography site for tech info and many fine photos of the theatres he's explored. And don't miss his page on the Globe Theatre.



Looking over to the dressing room area from on top of the DJ booth. Photo: Cap Equity Locations - 2014



A taller view from the DJ booth. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



The view downstage on dressing room level 3. The stairs are behind the red wall. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Out toward the auditorium from level 3. Photo: Cap Equity Locations - 2014



The vista upstage toward the fire escape door on level 3. Photo: Cap Equity Locations - 2014



The panoramic version from dressing room level 3. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



Looking onstage from the dressing room stairs. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Dressing room level 4. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014  



Toward the back wall from level 4. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



The proscenium wall at dressing room level 4. The bricked in opening gets you to the area above the top proscenium box -- presumably for easier attic access only used during construction. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014


On the stage left flyfloor: 


We're one level above above dressing room level 4. The stairs to the left of the fire escape exit get you down to the paint bridge and over to the stage right flyfloor. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



The rear of the fire curtain from the stage left flyfloor. We're looking through an old screen frame that's hung upstage. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



Up toward the grid from the stage left flyfloor. This little walkway and the striplight above it are a curious relic. The plank only extends onstage a couple more feet from what we see here. There's no place to go from there -- except to see a very angled view of the front of the fire curtain. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



The stage left ladder to the grid from the flyfloor. Thanks to Erik Chol, the proprietor of the Globe Theatre, for the November 2013 photo. That's Erik going up through the hole onto the grid. He says after going up that he realized how difficult and dangerous the work was in these old theatres. At the right of the photo we see the smoke pocket for the fire curtain.



A fuse panel on the proscenium wall at the stage left flyfloor level. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014


On the paint bridge: 


Looking back to the stage left dressing room floors. Thanks to Sandi Hemmerlein for her 2014 photo, one of many appearing in "The Globe Theatre Under Construction," her Avoiding Regret photo essay. Head there for many additional shots of her adventures crawling the theatre during a LAHTF "all-about" tour.

The LAHTF is active in promoting awareness of the historic theatres of Los Angeles and works toward their preservation. They frequently offer tours and sponsor other events related to historic preservation. www.lahtf.org | group Facebook page | official Facebook page  



A view from the paint bridge taken during the Club 740 days. The photo appears through the courtesy of Ralph Verdugo, the Club 740 proprietor.


Stage right:

Looking toward right. Note the paint bridge high on the back wall. That little vestibule at stage level on the right of the photo is  the alley entrance vestibule. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2013 



The entrance vestibule. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



A look into the vestibule during the theatre's Club 740 era. It's from the 740 South Broadway page of the site The Location Portal.



The view up underneath the paint bridge toward the stage right flyfloor. Photo: Sandi Hemmerlein - 2014



The proscenium wall stage right -- originally the location of the stage switchboard. Note the drywall in front of the bottom of the lattice track for the asbestos. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Across the stage from upstage right. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014 



The view from upstage right in the Club 740 days. Thanks to Don Solosan for his 2009 photo taken for the LAHTF.


On the stage right flyfloor: 


Looking downstage. Those snorkel-like pieces of conduit once held the cables dropping down to the borderlights. The ladder at right gets you up to the grid. In addition to the main pinrail we see here, there's another wooden one over on the stage right wall for the counterweighted sets that were once for the electric battens. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



A view from the paint bridge of the pinrail along the offstage wall. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



The downstage corner. Don't go down that ladder to the stage -- it's been chopped off quite a bit above the stage floor. That blower doesn't belong up here, of course. It was part of an improvised ventilation system. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



The proscenium wall. Note that Up/Down signal box hanging out of the wall. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



Up/Down signaling from the booth to the stagehand operating the curtain. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



The view onstage. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



An electric batten arbor. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



The arbor for one of the electric battens that's now carrying the screen frame. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Cast iron counterweights from one of the electric linesets. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



A winch adjacent to the ladder up to the paint bridge from the flyfloor. The stage right flyfloor is lower than the one stage left. The one on that side is on top of four floors of dressing rooms. There you take a few steps down to get to the bridge. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014


On the grid: 


The stage right edge. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Upstage along the stage right wall. These sheaves at the wall in the angle-iron brackets are for the five electric battens. At the upper right of the photo we get the upstage end of the hemp headbeam. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



A closer look at a headblock for one of the electric battens. Most of the rigging was hemp but these sets used wire rope for the lift lines. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Looking upstage at the rear of the hemp headblocks. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Underneath several of the hemp headblocks. This loftwell below the hemp headbeams offers a nice view down to the stage. One must cross it while ducking under the upper hemp headbeam to get onstage to the rest of the grid. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



The view onstage through a gap between hemp headblocks. Of course there were no lights up here that worked at the time of the visit. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



The onstage side of the hemp headbeams. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Along the proscenium wall. The large multigrooved sheave is the headblock for the fire curtain. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



The fire curtain beadblock. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Along the proscenium wall looking toward centerstage. The large sheaves that still have cables on them are for the fire curtain lift lines. Someone left us a can of WD-40, perhaps not the optimum lubricant for this equipment. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Across the grid to stage left. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



One of the hangers for the grid. The roof structure for this very solid building is concrete encased steel. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014


Down in the basement: 


The downstage left stairs to the basement. Photo: Sandi Hemmerlein - 2014  



At the bottom of the stairs stage left. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Looking across the trap room from downstage left. Heed the sign. And a clean basement it is. Behind us are the stairs up to the stage left dressing room area. Those stairs on the left of the photo get up into the orchestra pit -- there's another set down toward stage right. In the middle, directly under the pit, was the musicians' room. To our right are more dressing rooms. There's also a whole slew of them down under stage right. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



The trap room from upstage left. Thanks to Rebecca Reynoso of Cap Equity Locations the 2014 photo. See the Cap Equity Globe Theatre page for many more views.



An upstage left dressing room. This area was previously being used for chilled beverage storage Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



In the musicians' room, under the orchestra pit. The doorway off to the left is a corridor leading under the pit to the plenum area under the main floor, recently used as a club area. See the basement page for photos of that area. There used to be a fire door here. The door at right is one of two leading from this area back out into the trap room. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



In the trap room looking over toward stage right. The door with the exit sign goes to the musicians' room, under the orchestra pit. Take a left at the end of the trap room and you go downstage and around to a corridor farther offstage with more dressing rooms behind the ones we see here. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Stage construction viewed from underneath. The stage floor was raised about a foot when the new level auditorium deck was installed. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



A dressing room off the trap room upstage right. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014  



Another stage right room off the trap room. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Looking back across the trap room from stage right. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



A restroom off the trap room. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



The stage right stairs to the pit. The doorway at left goes into the musicians' room under the pit. At the right side of the photo jog right for more dressing rooms and, through the proscenium wall, the electric room under the house left proscenium boxes. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Looking back toward the trap room from downstage right. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Fire curtain rigging in the basement downstage right. We're looking at a tension block for the curtain's operating line -- under the stage. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



The downstage right corner of the basement. We're under the stage right wing space looking north. That's the proscenium wall at the left. Through the arch there and you're in the original theatre electric service room. The spiral staircase at the center once got you up to downstage right near the switchboard. The corridor at right leads upstage to several more dressing rooms. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



A stair detail. It was chopped off below stage level when the auditorium floor was leveled. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



The stage right corridor. We're looking upstage into an area of more dressing rooms. The proscenium wall is behind us, the trap room off to the right. Behind the right wall of the corridor are those dressing rooms opening onto the stage right side of the trap room. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014


Electric room downstage right: 
 

Looking into the old electric service room. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



Abandoned service gear on the north wall. The current electrical service equipment is above, out in the north exit passage alongside the theatre. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014

We're actually on the house side of the proscenium arch, in the triangular area just below the proscenium boxes. The doorway at the left leads into the former plenum space under the auditorium floor.



Looking back upstage. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014


In the orchestra pit: 


The stage left stairs up into the orchestra pit from the trap room. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



In the pit looking toward stage right. Photo: Bill Counter - 2014



A look at the plaster molding on the lip of the stage. Photo: Sandi Hemmerlein - 2014



The pit from stage right. That hole on the forward wall allows a look under the current floor. That's the original auditorium floor level where the concrete stops. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



Looking forward from the pit front wall into the space between the current auditorium floor and the original one. Photo: Hunter Kerhart - 2014



Boxes for low level lighting on the upstage pit wall. Photo: Sandi Hemmerlein - 2014



In the orchestra pit (still uncovered in 1976!) with Michael Caine and a burlesque show drummer in Peter Hyams film "Peeper" (20th Century Fox, 1976). 



A look toward the stage from the first row at Michael Caine and Natalie Wood in "Peeper." The other gentleman is the manager, who has been chasing Caine around the theatre telling him he needs to buy a ticket. In the film the Globe is a burlesque theatre where Michael Caine goes to look for runaway Natalie Wood. See the Historic L.A. Theatres in Movies post for more shots at the Globe from the film.

Many thanks to Erik Chol for his hospitality in allowing access to explore all the areas of his theatre.

The Globe Theatre pages:  history | vintage exterior views | recent exterior views | lobby areas | recent auditorium views | earlier auditorium views | attic | back to top - backstage | basement | garland building |

| Downtown: theatre district overview | Hill St. and farther west | Broadway theatres | Spring St. theatres | Main St. and farther east | downtown theatres by address | downtown theatres alphabetical list

| Westside | Hollywood | Westwood and Brentwood | Along the Coast | [more] Los Angeles movie palaces | the main alphabetical list | theatre history resources | film and theatre tech resources | theatres in movies | LA Theatres on facebook | contact info | welcome and site navigation guide

No comments:

Post a Comment